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Triangle

Torchon triangle
Cloth and half stitch triangles

A triangle is a solid shape used in Torchon lace, especially near the footside. It can can be worked in either cloth stitch or half stitch. The effect of the two are different, but they are worked the same except for the stitches. See pattern 397.

These descriptions shows a triangle (sloping sides 4 pins). It is possible to have a smaller triangle (3 long) although that might look a little sparse. There are also bigger triangles - the cloth triangle above has 5 pins. I hope you can see how to adapt the following explanations for those.

These diagrams avoids the complexities of the individual stitches by showing each pair of threads as a single line. Where one line crosses another, you should work it in cloth stitch or half stitch or the appropriate footside stitch.

The number below shows the number of pairs actually part of the triangle at each row. This number changes for different rows, and getting too many or too few pairs in a row is a common mistake. If you get to the bottom of a triangle, and have less or more than two pairs, then you have made a mistake. You will have to undo the lace to see where you have dropped off or picked up more than one pair, or where you forgot. Keep an eye on where pairs of threads need to join or leave the triangle.

There are different ways of working a triangle.




1. Triangle next to footside, where worker pair enters footside:

Torchon triangle triangle pattern

Bobbin lace triangle

Repeat Step Back

Working: Work the lace above the triangle (such as ground). Do not work the edge pins of the triangle yet. In a triangle, you work rows of stitches. You start with two pairs, a worker pair, and a passive pair. The left side is like a diamond, where you pick up a pair at each pin until the widest point, then drop off a pair at each pin until the bottom, where you should have two pairs again.

The right side is more complicated, as you need to connect the triangle to the footside. Alternate rows are treated differently. One row takes the worker pair out of the traingle, and into the footside. This replaces the edge pair of the foottside, which returns to the triangle as the new worker pair. In the next row, the worker pair does not leave the triangle. It goes round the pin at that edge of the triangle. It sounds complicated, but if you step through the animation above, hopefully you will see what is happening.

The occasional swapping over of the worker pair of the triangle and the edge pair of the footside means that if you are trying to colour the triangle, you need to have both these the same colour, as in the photo.




2. Triangle next to footside, where worker pair stays within triangle:

Torchon triangle triangle pattern

Working: Work the lace above the triangle (such as ground). Do not work the edge pins of the triangle yet. In a triangle, you work rows of stitches. You start with two pairs, a worker pair, and a passive pair. The left side is like a diamond, where you pick up a pair at each pin until the widest point, then drop off a pair at each pin until the bottom, where you should have two pairs again.

The right side is more complicated, as you need to connect the triangle to the footside. Alternate rows are treated differently. One row takes the pair from the footside into the triangle for one pin. So the worker pair works through this as well as the other passives. Once the worker has returned across the triangle, the footside pair returns to do the next footside pin. In the next row, the worker pair does not include the footside pair, but just goes round the pin at that edge of the triangle.

As the worker pair stay within the triangle, all the pairs of the footside can, if you wish, be a different colour, as in the photo.

Please note that there are pin holes down the vertical side of the triangle which are not on the normal Torchon grid. This is because there needs to be the same number of pins on the right side of the pattern as the left side, so extra pins are required. The footside pins are also not on the normal grid. It sounds complicated, but if you step through the animation above, hopefully you will see what is happening.

Bobbin lace triangle

Repeat Step Back




3. Triangle next to footside, where worker pair enters Winkie pin footside:

Torchon triangle triangle pattern

Working: Work the lace above the triangle (such as ground). Do not work the edge pins of the triangle yet. In a triangle, you work rows of stitches. You start with two pairs, a worker pair, and a passive pair. The left side is like a diamond, where you pick up a pair at each pin until the widest point, then drop off a pair at each pin until the bottom, where you should have two pairs again.

The right side is more complicated, as you need to connect the triangle to the footside. Alternate rows are treated differently. One row takes the worker pair out of the traingle, across the passive pair of the footside. Since this is a Winkie pin footside, the same pair goes round the pin, then across the footside passive pair to return to the triangle. So the same worker pair is used throughout the triangle, which can be helpful if you want to colour the tringle. In the next row, the worker pair does not leave the triangle. It goes round the pin at that edge of the triangle. It sounds complicated, but if you step through the animation above, hopefully you will see what is happening.

Bobbin lace triangle

Repeat Step Back

Working: First, note that the pattern no longer has the extra pin holes along the vertical edge. Everything conforms to the Torchon grid. Now start working the triangle as above until you reach the row where there is a footside pin. Now the worker pair leaves the triangle. Twist the workers, and carry on working across the footside passive, round the footside pin, and back again. Then the worker pair re-enters the triangle for the next row. If there is no footside pin, then just work to the left edge of the triangle, and back again.




4. Triangle without a footside:

Torchon triangle triangle pattern

Here, the worker pair of the triangle goes up to the edge. The pin holes are quite close together. It is, in fact, the same as a fan headside except with a straight edge rather than a curved edge.