up a level

Pattern 397 - Triangles with ordinary footside

There are two other similar patterns showing how you can work triangles, pattern 395 and pattern 396. Here are two more! Why do we have so many ways of doing triangles? I think it's because it's a shape which doesn't really fit within the normal Torchon way of doing things, with this vertical edge. But it's a very useful shape. So lacemakers have tended to work out their own way of doing it. Some are more obvious, some look neater, some look prettier, some use less bobbins. It's a matter of taste.

Picture of lace

Pattern: Pattern of lace
Pattern of lace

Bobbins: 14 pairs (6 pairs triangle colour, 8 pairs background colour)

Style: Torchon

Stitches:
   half stitch
   cloth stitch and twist
   cloth stitch

Details:
   Torchon ground (grey)
   rose ground (pink)
   triangle (red)

Description:

There are several ways to work a triangle. This pattern shows one way.

You start the top of the triangle with two pairs, in a similar way to fans or diamonds. The inner side of the triangle behaves exactly like a diamond. The problem is the vertical edge (straight down). There are pin holes down that edge, but there aren't enough of them! Alternate rows don't have a pin hole there. Instead, you take the worker pair through its normal row, then into the footside. (That is: cloth stitch and twist through the footside passive pair, cloth stitch and twist with the edge pair, pin inside the two pairs, then take the old edge pair through the passives in cloth stitch and twist.) That completes the pin hole on the extreme edge of the lace, the footside hole. It also leaves the old edge pair in position to become the new worker pair for the triangle. So every now and then, you change the worker pair for the triangle.

There are implications about this for colour. It's the worker pair which colours the shape, and you're changing the worker pair. However, you're only swapping the edge pair and the worker pair. So if the edge pair and the worker pair are the same colour, then the triangle will be coloured as you expect. Of course, you need the outer passives of the triangle also to be that colour, as for the fans. That means six pairs should be the triangle colour, and eight pairs should be the background colour. The pattern shows which colour starts where. You may prefer to make the footside passives as the triangle colour as well. I've left them as the background colour, to show (a bit) what's going on. Of course, you could make all the pairs the same colour!

Picture of lace
Close up of the lace, so you can see the working in more detail



This method has a footside, but it is joined to the triangles in a different way to the first method.

Picture of lace

Pattern: Pattern of lace
Pattern of lace

Bobbins: 16 pairs (4 pairs triangle colour, 12 pairs background)

Stitches:
   half stitch
   cloth stitch and twist
   cloth stitch

Details:
   Torchon ground (grey)
   rose ground (pink)
   triangle (red)

In alternate rows of the triangle, the worker pair just go to the edge of the triangle (like the second method) as there is nothing from the footside to meet it. But for the other rows, the worker pair meets the pair from the footside, does a double Torchon stitch (cloth stitch and twist, pin, cloth stitch and twist) and returns to the triangle. Meanwhile the pair from the footside returns back to the footside. That means that the three pairs in the footside (edge, passive and lace side) stay at the edge, and never enter the rest of the lace at all. So you can colour them how you want - as back ground, as triangle colour, or a completely different colour if you choose. I've made them background colour, and that means there are only 4 pairs to colour the triangle.

The start and finish of this example is a little odd, because the triangles are offset. The important thing is to get the two coloured pairs to the start of the lower triangle. If you can work out another way, by all means, use it!

Picture of lace
Close up of the lace, so you can see the working in more detail